Sturgeon’s Law

Theodore Sturgeon was a very successful science fiction writer. One night at a cocktail party, he was was introduced to another guest, someone who did not know him, who asked, “So Theodore, what is it that you do?”

Sturgeon replied, “I’m a science fiction writer.” To which the other party guest responded, “Science fiction! 90% of science fiction is crap!”

Sturgeon retort, “90% of everything is crap!” has become immortalized, as Sturgeon’s Law.

Sturgeon died in 1985 and his Law has yet to be disproven!

Whether you are a writer, video producer or any other type of creative person, or if you work with creative people, it’s well to keep in mind Sturgeon’s Law. The process of editing and separating the wheat from the chaff can be as important as the creative act itself.

For example, for every great photograph from esteemed photographers like Jim Marshall or Gary Winogrand, there are dozens of shots the public has never seen and never will see, because these photographers themselves considered these shots “crap.”

In fact, somewhere out there is a quote from a photographer that the best way to show a great photograph is to not show all the bad shots you’ve taken.

Author: Mentorphile

Mentor, coach, and advisor to entrepreneurs, small businesses, and non-profit organizations. General manager with significant experience in both for-profit and non-profit organizations. Focus on media and information. On founding team of four venture-backed companies. Currently Chairman of Popsleuth, Inc., maker of the Endorfyn app for keeping fans updated on new stuff from their favorite artists.

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