When it comes to building companies, Waste is good!

arts-hs-insider

The common maxims of startups are that “cash is king” and you must “stretch the dollar.”  And that conventional wisdom is just that, conventional. But there’s another side to spending, as the editorial director of Conde Nast, Alexander Liberman, the mentor of the owner S.I. NewHouse, oversaw ballooning editorial budgets and the lavish image of Conde Naste.

You may recall Gordon Gecko in the film Wall Street proclaiming in stentorian tones,”Greed is good!” Well he had nothing on Alexander Liberman, who summed up the company’s ethos when he said: “I believe in waste. Waste is very important to creativity.” And he should know something about creativity, as Liberman was a success in painting, sculpture, and photography before joining Conde Naste.

And as many music and film fans know, a single song or single scene may be redone dozens and dozens of times until the creative person in charge  – the record producer or the movie director – is satisfied. No one cared how many reels of tape were wasted by the Beatles in recording the Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band – it was a massive hit, just as no one was counting up the thousands of feet of film left on the cutting room floor by George Lucas, director of Star Wars.

I was taught by VCs that spending should be an investment in the company and should be carefully monitored by management for its ROI. But I was also told by an early investor and mentor after raising many millions of dollars from is firm that, “You’re going to waste a million dollars launching this company. You just don’t know which million.” That advice gave us the freedom to experiment, to fail, and then fail harder the next time, until we finally did get it right and the company became a hit.

As Apple Designer Director Jony Ive points out, problem solving is necessary in creating a great product, but it is creativity that’s the spark that ignites the development process and fuels the fire.

So does that mean founders should add a new line item to their budgets labelled, “Creativity” or “Waste”? Probably not, but I wouldn’t rule it out. What founders do need to do is to make creativity and problem solving the first duties of their staff, not toeing the line in a line item budget. I learned this lesson the hard way. I started Throughline, Inc. as a way to help founders save time and money on the necessary infrastructure of their companies: office space, furniture, servers, telephone systems, etc. I mistakenly thought VCs would love me and promote Throughline to their portfolio companies.  And one VC did buy the story and invested half a million dollars to start the company. And we did acquire a great strategic investor, Silicon Valley Bank – the go-to bank for founders.  But Throughline did not succeed. What I learned post-mortem, and should have learned pre-mortem through customer discovery, was that VCs could care less about operating expenses. What do they care about? Growth! Growth in eyeballs, users, customers, market share, brand, and a talented staff – the top line, not the bottom line.

Management is doing things right, leadership is doing the right things. Leave cash management to your bookkeeper or contractor CFO. As a founder, your first duty is not cash management it’s customer acquisition. Look no further than Uber, which is losing billions of dollars, but has grown faster in both customer acquisition and revenues than almost any other startup in history. As a result, even as a massive money-loser to the tune of one billion dollars a quarter!, Uber is valued at as much as $120 billion.

The true bottomline is that building companies and building products is an art, it’s a creative endeavor. Companies have announced this in their names: Software Arts, Electronic Arts. If you have a great idea, start building!

 

Author: Mentorphile

Mentor, coach, and advisor to entrepreneurs, small businesses, and non-profit organizations. General manager with significant experience in both for-profit and non-profit organizations. Focus on media and information. On founding team of four venture-backed companies. Currently Chairman of Popsleuth, Inc., maker of the Endorfyn app for keeping fans updated on new stuff from their favorite artists.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s