Sometimes advice columns don’t dish out the best advice!

 

businessMost of the ventures I mentor plan to raise capital at some point in their venture’s life, if they haven’t already. So being as I have been out of the capital raising game for the better part of a decade, I try to read as much as I can to keep up with current trends in startup investing. Thus I just had to read the article 4 Reasons Why Investors Won’t Invest In Your Business Model, sub-titled Approaching the private equity firms or investors and persuading them in [sic] the most daunting task for businessmen. A typo in the sub-title is not a good leading indicator, but I read on. And it’s repeated in the first paragraph! But this is from Entrepreneur.com, usually a reliable source … So let’s look at their “four reasons.” But first, always look at the author. In this case it’s not a person, it’s “BusinessEx Staff” not a named individual. So credibility goes down a few notches.

1.    Fail To Foresee The Future

I have the feeling this was written by a non-native English speaker, as the title would typically be “Failure to…” or “Failing to…”  First of all private equity firms rarely “scrutinize new entrepreneurs” because they rarely invest in new entrepreneurs. Private equity firms invest in on-going businesses or even buy them outright, with the goal of re-engineering the business and thus being able to sell it or even take it public at a significantly higher value than they paid for it.  Yes, “buy low, sell high.” Remember that! The only way one can know for sure if an entrepreneur can successfully foresee the future is to wait for the future to arrive … which can take years. But I do have to agree with the statement that “… it is vital as to how a business owner executes the plan and mould [sic] an emerging, nascent company out of it.” As Bill Gates has said, “Ideas are cheap, success is 99% execution.”

And I also agree with the statement: “The entrepreneurs, who lose this vision or get diverged by the money factor, fail to build concrete foundations of the business.” While again the English is tortured, the point is that entrepreneurs do need a lodestone to focus their attention. Having no vision or losing site of the vision results in companies thrashing – constantly pivoting. So no one can foresee the future, but you can execute your plan well, or not. And you need to build a plan to achieve your vision.

2.    Improper Cash Flows

Yes, the saying “cash is king in startups” is true. The worse thing an entrepreneur can do is to run out of cash. So being able to present a cash flow statement based on strong assumptions and early performance is indeed important.

3.    The Enormous Size Of C-Suite Executives

I’ve written before about the incredible growth in the size of the C-Suite. We now have Chief Design Officers, Chief Security Officers, Chief People Officers. You name it, there’s a Chief for it. Too many cooks do indeed spoil the dish. I am in violent agree with the message that startups should not have too many C-Suite executives. CEO and CTO should be enough for a raw startup. Having more CXXs is a red flag. Cliches prove true yet again: “Too many chiefs, not enough Indians.”

4.    Inability To Understand The Competitors

Back in the last century investors used to say in all my pitch meetings, “But what if Microsoft decides to copy what you are doing?” That got superseded by “What if Google decides to copy what you are doing?” I used to tell my mentees to ignore the “What if GiantCo enters your market?” question until I saw Instagram rip off the Stories feature from SnapChat, which fueled the growth of Instagram and hobbled SnapChat. So you better be sure that you aren’t hanging the entire fate of your company on one feature that isn’t difficult to clone – because success breeds many cloners, failures none.

Despite the inelegant English like “The business owners should further avoid these mistakes by planning strategized moves to entice funders and investors.” the advice is correct, but the idea the startups are going to be pitching private equity companies is just wrong. Where private equity does come in these days is in later rounds of companies growing rapidly that need a lot of capital, like Uber. The risk is much lower for these late round investors.  Let’s hope you are so successful that private equity comes knocking at your door! Until then execute, manage your cash tightly, keep the number of executives down to the bare minimum, and keep your eye out for competitors. Better yet build your company on a sound, sustainable competitive advantage.

Author: Mentorphile

Mentor, coach, and advisor to entrepreneurs, small businesses, and non-profit organizations. General manager with significant experience in both for-profit and non-profit organizations. Focus on media and information. On founding team of four venture-backed companies. Currently Chairman of Popsleuth, Inc., maker of the Endorfyn app for keeping fans updated on new stuff from their favorite artists.

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