Why shouldn’t you raise money now?

NowLater-compressed

I’ve outlined numerous reasons to raise money now – the pros, as it were. But raising capital is a two-sided coin, usually many of them, so here are the cons.

Distraction

The name of the game in startups is focus. Raising capital is a very difficult and intense process that will distract the CEO/founders from the venture’s main business: building product and acquiring customers. In fact, I can’t think of much else that is more distracting other than a major rift between founders. It can easily take six months from the time you start your capital raise to the time your funds are wire transferred into your bank account. That’s a lifetime in a startup.

Resource limits

Draining limited resources – namely the CEO/founder’s time – is perhaps the biggest reason to avoid raising capital, especially from venture capitalists, who can drag out the process unless you can create a strong sense of urgency, which probably has to be a very real threat they will lose a deal they really want. CEOs in startups are completely different than CEOs in mature companies, as CEOs are also individual contributors, either in sales, business development, product development, customer support or all of the above.

Dilution

When I was raising capital way back in the last century the rule of thumb was that VCs would take about 35% to 40% of your equity in the Series A round, leaving the company with 60% to 65%. Today I’m hearing that it’s more likely 50%. I only have a few data points on this, so check with your friends in the founder ecosystem. VC’s also insist on the founders setting aside roughly 20% for future hires – note well that the company takes this dilution, not the VCs! So the founders now are left with about 40% to 45% of the company they started – a minority interest! There are two good ways to avoid dilution: one, finance your company with customer revenue, grants, and friends and family money; the second is to build substantial value before raising money: large numbers of customers, very rapid growth in customer base, and running the company on customer revenue and perhaps friends and family money. The longer you wait to raise capital the less equity you have to sell to acquire the same amount of funding. That’s why it’s not now, but perhaps later.

The battle over equity allocation

Here’s another rule of thumb, mine: the earlier the stage of the company the more difficult it is to allocate equity fairly. For example, let’s say you haven’t yet built your product. How do you measure the contribution of the tech team? You have to bet something on the future value of their contributions. Similarly how can you evaluate the contribution of sales, marketing or business development team members when you are pre first customer ship or even pre-revenue! Again waiting until you hit some major milestones like first paying customer or even breakeven will enable you to better evaluate the contribution and thus the equity allocation of each team member. See Chapter Six: Reward Dilemmas: Equity Splits and Cash Compensation in The Founder’s Dilemma by Noam Wasserman.

Giving up control

With a Series A round your investor will most certainly take a Board seat. If you syndicate your round you might end up with two VCs on your Board. And if you have given up 50% of your equity on the first round the second round will put the VCs firmly in the driver’s seat, if they aren’t already. As CEO are you prepared to report to a Board of Directors? Are you certain your investor is as much aligned with your interests as possible? Giving up control is one of the major reasons I hear from founders for not raising capital, now.

Constant pressure for hyper-growth

Once you accept VC money you have bought a ticket on a rocket ship which must reach escape velocity or fall back to earth in a ball of fire. The pressure to grow at virtually all costs will be unrelenting. If you thrive under this type of pressure that’s good. Otherwise you might want to think of another way to finance your venture.

To sum up, the key word in both this and the previous post on reasons to raise capital now is now. You and your team need to establish measurable milestones for at least the first 12 months of the company’s life. Then you need to decide what will be the triggering event to start to raise money. Absolutely the best time is when investors are calling you. That’s why, while you are building your product and your company, you also need to create buzz. Buzz will help generate incoming contacts by job candidates, prospective partners, and it is hoped, investors.

Finally if you decide the time is now, take a look at my post Are you investor ready?

 

 

Author: Mentorphile

Mentor, coach, and advisor to entrepreneurs, small businesses, and non-profit organizations. General manager with significant experience in both for-profit and non-profit organizations. Focus on media and information. On founding team of four venture-backed companies. Currently Chairman of Popsleuth, Inc., maker of the Endorfyn app for keeping fans updated on new stuff from their favorite artists.

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