Pitch tips from a leading VC

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A recent megatrend that has greatly benefited founders has been the willingness of leading venture capitalists to share their knowledge with founders. Brad Feld of Foundry Group, Fred Wilson of Union Square Ventures, and Guy Kawasaki, Garage Ventures have lead the way. (What do they have in common? They’ve all met me!). Now they are joined by Scott Kupor, the managing partner of Andreessen Horowitz (a16z), whose portfolio includes multi-billion unicorns like Lyft, Slack, Pinterest and Airbnb.

I became aware of Scott Kupor’s book via Carmine Gallo’s Inc. article Five Essential Pitch Tips According To A Legendary Investor Behind Lyft, Slack, And Airbnb. Carmine is the best writer on how to do a presentation that I know of. You can search my blog for mentions of his books, which are all highly recommended. Start with The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs, a classic. Carmine has been writing for Inc. for some time and I make sure to never miss an article of his.

Despite all the books and articles I’ve read about how to do a VC pitch I learned a lot from Carmine’s interview with Scott Kupor. You can watch the video, which is embedded in Carmine Gallo’s article. Here are the five tips from Scott Kupor with my annotations.

1. Market Size

It’s interesting that Scott puts market size first. Of the three main determinants of a VC investment, team is usually put first, followed by either market opportunity or product/secret sauce. But I find that founders have the most trouble with market size. Either they make the beginner’s mistake of taking some arbitrary, and far too large, percentage of a large market (“If we just get 15% of the entire $92 billion shoe market …”), or they muddle through some proxies for their market. Read my post Sizing your market opportunity for a more sophisticated approach.  But Scott has a unique approach:

It’s an entrepreneur’s job to be a “patient and inspiring teacher.” In other words, don’t assume that your audience—even one made of up VCs—understands your market or its potential size.

This goes back to the need to tell a story rather than just recite dry statistics or show complex graphs.

2. Team

As I tell founders, there are two questions a VC has to answer in the positive to fund you: Is this a billion dollar idea? and Is this the right team to execute it? Too often I find entrepreneurs, especially students and recent grads, focus on their academic credentials – their list of degrees from prestigious universities – rather than one thing: what expertise and experience does their team possess that in Kupor’s words “… make this team – hands down – the best team to approach this idea?”

3. Product

Here’s an interesting point from Scott Kupor: “investors love to learn and are fascinated by how something works.” He uses the term “idea maze” for the twisting, turning process that turns an idea into a real world product. But that’s understanding your idea maze is not enough! Investors want to know why your product is 10X better than the existing alternatives along the typical dimensions: faster, better, cheaper, easier to use. Peter Drucker is responsible for this, as he stated that a new product must be 10x better to displace an incumbent product. And note, VCs will tell you they need to make 10X their investment to have a successful fund. Show them enough 10Xs and you may just get funded! 10X would make a great name for a company if it weren’t already taken.

4. Go-to-Market

Like market opportunity this part of the pitch tends to be a weak spot for the founders I mentor, perhaps because virtually all of them are first timers. Those who have previously founded a startup or worked an an early stage company realize how important the customer acquisition part of their pitch is. Kupor says this is often the most underdeveloped section of the pitch, especially for early-stage companies. You need to present a combination of your business model and marketing plan that demonstrates you know how you will acquire customers at a cost that is just a small fraction of their lifetime value. In other words, profitably. You don’t need complex spreadsheet models forecasting 5 years of financials. What you do need are sound assumptions derived from a lot of first hand interaction with customers.

5. Planning

Planning boils down to one thing:  what milestones will you reach with the money you are raising in this round? A corollary of this is, how long with this round last? A range of 12 to 18 months is typical. Fund raising is resource intensive for founders, so you don’t want to have to raise another round too soon. On the other hand, if you are going to grow at the dizzying rate that VCs expect, you are going to need more funding in less than two years.

I teach founders that the job of their product is to make its users successful and satisfied. And when selling to the enterprise find a product champion who will see that by driving adoption of your product for their firm they will be rewarded. If you can make your customers successful, your venture will be successful.

Scott Kupor makes a similar point about VCs. They want to look like heroes to their customers: their limited partners whose money they are investing.  So, consider VCs as your customers and thus it’s your mandate to help them succeed by making your company a success.

Author: Mentorphile

Mentor, coach, and advisor to entrepreneurs, small businesses, and non-profit organizations. General manager with significant experience in both for-profit and non-profit organizations. Focus on media and information. On founding team of four venture-backed companies. Currently Chairman of Popsleuth, Inc., maker of the Endorfyn app for keeping fans updated on new stuff from their favorite artists.

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