The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs

pres-secrets

I consider to be one of my responsibilities as a mentor to be providing  entrepreneurs pointers to helpful resources .

The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs: How to Be Insanely Great in Front of Any Audience by Carmine Gallo is a book I highly recommend.

I saw Steve launch the Mac in 1984 at the Boston Computer Society and launch the NeXT Machine in San Francisco, along with watching virtually all of his product intros that Apple has made available on video.

Carmine Gallo has gone through all of Steve’s presentations and extracted the principles that help make his presentations so effective.

Just so my biases are clear: I consider Steve to be the best presenter, sales person, marketer, and product visionary ever. I only met him once and briefly, when he came to MIT because we were selling the NeXT machine in the MIT computer store, which I was responsible for building. But I can understand how people who worked with him talked about “his reality distortion field”. He had more charisma than the next ten charismatic people I’ve ever known.

Reading this book will not enable you to present as if you were Steve Jobs, but it will certainly help you create presentations that are clear, simple, concise, engaging and memorable.

Delivering a successful pitch

I find a large part of mentoring activity at both MIT VMS and SIF is helping companies prepare investor pitches and reviewing their pitches. Companies, even established ones, are always pitching, to investors, potential partners, analysts, and others.

The attached document was developed in collaboration with Bill Warner, one of Boston’s premier entrepreneurs and angel investors. I had the privilege of working for Bill at Warner Research. Bill is a great mentor and I learned a lot from him about pitching, the need for alignment of the founding team, about intentions, and much more.

Warning this is a long document, it will take longer to read than any pitch will to deliver. But while it was done years ago I think it’s still valid.

Delivering_a_successful_pitch